Roster Analysis: Part VII

d7_leadWith the front 7 defensively out of the way, we now take a look at the back end of our defense. I don’t know if you would go so far to say it’s the strength of our defense, but it seems to have the most front line talent. Not to say it couldn’t use an upgrade here or there, but a talented front 7 can make the back end look like world beaters….

Part VII-Defensive Backs

by Dewey

Cornerbacks

-Desmond Trufant, Robert Alford, Jalen Collins, Philip Adams, Travis Howard

d7_TrufantDesmond Trufant-signed through the 2016 season, $2,598,303 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$1,379,745 dead money, $1,218,558 cap savings

Cut post 6/1-same

Trade-$1,079,745 dead money, $1,518,558 cap savings

Desmond is easily the top pass defender in the Falcons defensive backfield, and he’s starting to earn that reputation league wide. Through the first couple of games of the 2015 season, before teams realized we had no pass rush and were trying to get the ball off quickly, Desmond wasn’t even targeted. Later, after opposing QB’s became to know they had all day to throw the ball, some would take a shot Desmond’s way knowing no one can cover a WR forever. Desmond is also a sure tackler for the Falcons, though not a big hitter. Desmond should be at the top of his game again in 2016, hopefully with a little more help from his front 7.

d7_alfordRobert Alford-signed through the 2016 season, $1,082,263 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$213,346 dead money, $868,827 cap savings

Cut post 6/1-same

Trade-same

After a very difficult rookie season, Robert made some decent, not spectacular, strides his 2nd season. Now, after 2 seasons, you would expect Alford would make spectacular strides for his 3rd season. Nope, once again, decent, not spectacular. If you look at Robert from his rookie season to now, you can see how much better he is. Most folks don’t see the change because Alford’s a gambler. He will play close, jump routes, try and time the ball, always very aggressive looking for the takeaway. Night and day from Trufant actually who is more of a technician, playing it by the book, hoping for a takeaway. The problem with Alford’s play is his aggressiveness costs him in penalties as well as getting burned for the occasional long completion. I have been searching for the article for days, and my apologies, I can’t find it, but I promise it’s out there. Anyway, in the article, it states how, among qualifying CB’s in the NFL, only 2 players ranked ahead of Desmond Trufant in completions allowed in 2015. Patrick Peterson and Richard Sherman both tied for the fewest at 31 allowed. Desmond was right behind them with 32. Right behind Desmond? Robert Alford with 38. That’s right, he ranked #4 in the NFL in fewest completions allowed by a CB in 2015. Lastly I will say this, in mid-season when the coaching staff decided to start playing Collins more, then backed off after a few games, Alford came back playing a lot better, sounder football. Just wish I could forget about him giving up on the long touchdown in the first game against Carolina.

d7_collinsJalen Collins-signed through the 2018 season, $1,233,599 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$2,337,357 dead money, $1,103,758 cap charge NOT savings

Cut post 6/1-$1,233,599 dead money, $0 cap savings

Trade-$1,655,637 dead money, $422,038 cap charge NOT savings

RANT TIME!!!!!!!!! ANYONE WHO DOESN’T WANT TO READ ME GOING ON A TIRADE, SKIM DOWN TO THE NEXT PLAYER PLEASE!!!!!

OK, if you’re still reading, remember, I warned you. Jalen Collins was a waste of a 2nd round draft pick. At the 2015 draft, we were not the Patriots, Broncos, Packers, or any of the other really good teams looking for players who might contribute this year, hopefully in a year or two, or just trying to smooth out the rough back end of our roster. We were the bloody Atlanta Falcons who had just come off 2 seasons going a combined 10-22 with more holes in the team then in a swiss cheese factory, no offensive line, no pass rush, no tight ends, no linebackers and we just drafted 2 CB’s in rounds 1 & 2 two drafts ago in the 2013 NFL draft. What the f*@k was Quinn, Dimwitt, Pioli, King Arthur, whom ever thinking. Oh, wait, wait, wait, I’m sorry, I’m mistaken to put the blame on them, I completely forgot, it was all that Lionel Vital’s fault. He’s the one that apparently screwed the whole thing up. Look, I understand Quinn found a pot of gold at the end of the fifth round rainbow in the 2011 draft with Richard Sherman. He likes the size, the athleticism, and thinks all it takes is some coaching and WHAM! Richard Sherman 2.0. Let’s take a look and compare and contrast the players before they got to the pros shall we? Richard Sherman was a WR for his first 3 seasons at Stanford. Caught 81 passes for over 1,300 yards and 7 TD’s in basically 2 seasons. The fourth game of his junior season he was injured and missed the rest of the year. Coming back for his senior year, he was switched to DB, was good enough to start 13 games, pick off a couple of passes, returned 1 for a touchdown and had over 60 tackles. Did he bolt for the NFL? No! He applied for and was granted a medical redshirt for his lost junior year, came back to school, honed his craft enough to get drafted. Started a total of 26 games in college at CB with 6 INT’s. Drafted so late mainly because he was “raw” having only played 2 seasons at CB. Now let’s look at Mr. Collins. Played a total of 32 games in 3 seasons at LSU, with 9 starts, 1 INT. Got in trouble for, what we think was weed (not confirmed), bolted after his junior season because of his draft status (1st/2nd rounder). Don’t even get me started on what idiots said he should be good enough to be a 1st/2nd rounder, think I covered it pretty well in the dline section with Grady and Hageman. But what the hell made Quinn think, given a guy was only good enough to start 9 games in 3 seasons at LSU, that he was worthy of a 2nd round pick, nevermind reaching shutdown CB status. There is raw (Sherman) and there is not good enough(Collins), sorry, I refuse to call him raw. I can go down to my local high school, find a guy that is over 6 feet tall, over 200lbs, can run like the wind, jump over the moon, but he’ll be a “raw” CB, wanna take him in the 2nd round this year? Well, Collins wasn’t quite good enough to see the field the first half of the year, then someone decided he was good enough to play outside CB in nickel and dime situations, then in took them 4 games or so to realize they were WRONG!!!!!!! d7_collins2Then Collins didn’t see the field except for special teams the last 3-4 games of the year. With Trufant’s and Alford’s contracts both coming up at the end of the 2016 season, chances are 1 has got to go(Alford?), so it’s good to have a replacement ready so you don’t need to start a rookie in 2017 if you don’t have to. But couldn’t we have drafted that guy this year, when last year in the 2nd round we could have drafted someone that could have helped in 2015 and beyond, like I dunno, LB’s Bernardrick McKinney, Eric Kendricks, Hau’oli Kikaha, Denzel Perryman, C Mitch Morse, G Ali Marpet, S Eric Rowe, DE Nate Orchard. Hell, I’d have even take Randy Gregory and all his problems. Sorry, getting off on my rant again. Look, this is one where you just have to hope that Quinn knows what he’s doing, and hope he and Collins figure things out pretty damn quickly. Thank you, I now return you to your regularly scheduled roster evaluation. Oh, wait, I almost forgot. If the Collins drafting was all on Quinn, then that really terrifies me for our drafting future. It is said that Quinn and Dimwitt see eye to eye on a lot of things, they work well together, share the same vision. One of the things you could see in Dimwitt’s drafts was his love affair with potential over production. Dimwitt loves the draft combine and things like wingspans, standing broad jumps, and the like. Things that don’t tell you how good a football player is, but how good he could, not should, be. Well, what if Quinn has the same vision? What if Quinn likes the cybermetrics aspect that Dimwitt brings to a draft room? Sleep on that! Sorry again, I promise to continue on with the analysis now.

Philip Adams-contract expired, unrestricted free agent

I liked Philip Adams for what we needed him for. Was a solid #3 or #4 CB all year for the Falcons. Even when Collins moved in for a few weeks, Adams played just as smart and hard as he had before. I don’t know if, with 3 young CB’s under contract that they’ll re-up Adams for another tour, but I wouldn’t mind having him around, or someone a lot like him.

Travis Howard-signed through the 2016 season, $450,000 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$0 dead money, $450,000 cap savings

Cut post 6/1-same

Trade-same

Had to do some digging on Travis to find anything about him. 6’1”, 200lbs, so he’s got the size Quinn likes. Not overly fast, 4.5-4.58 40 times, so not slow either. Played his college ball at Ohio State so he comes from a football factory. Was signed as an UDFA by Houston following the 2013 draft. Cut, signed by New England,released, signed to New England’s practice squad, released, signed to the Giants practice squad in December of 2013. The next season, he was waived/injured by the Giants, when he cleared waivers, the Giants signed him to injured reserve for 2014. March of 2015 he was released by the Giants. August of 2015 the Falcons signed him and put him on injured reserve in September. A lot of teams, a lot of injuries in a small amount of time for Mr. Howard. Here’s hoping things get better for him.

Analysis: The front line CB’s for the Falcons are good. If the pass rush can improve, it will cut down on a lot of those long passes. Some still feel Alford’s best position is as a nickel CB covering the slot. Regardless, Collins is the wild card here. If Collins doesn’t improve a ton by next season, the 2017 off season could get very interesting with Trufant and Alford both coming up on free agency.

My Conclusion: Trufant and Alford are fine. With all of our other holes/weaknesses, it would be foolish to throw money/draft picks away on another CB. Collins has got to make strides, big strides, a lot bigger than Alford made from year #1 to year #2. I would sign Adams, or a player of his like talent, in the off season just to be safe. Nowadays, you need 3 solid CB’s at least, 4 is even better. I wouldn’t waste a pick here unless a certain player is available in the 7th round. I don’t want to spoil it yet. I’ll come back to it later.

Prediction: Adams or another CB will be signed in free agency and there will be 2-3 come in off UDFA. Quinn isn’t going to give up on Collins yet, but I don’t get the feeling Quinn carries a lot of rope around with him. He’ll have the opportunity to show his improvements in 2016 and if they’re not up to Quinn’s standards, he could be gone by 2017. I doubt they draft one, but I would have bet my house we wouldn’t have taken one so early last year either, so what do I know?

Strong Safeties

-William Moore, Kemal Ishmael, Akeem King

d7_mooreWilliam Moore-under contract through the 2017 season, $6,493,750 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$3,300,000 dead money, $3,193,750 cap savings

Cut post 6/1-$1,650,000 dead money, $4,843,750 cap savings

Trade-same as pre 6/1

William Moore is exactly the type of strong safety Coach Dan Quinn needs to help make his defense very successful, except for 1 small detail, it only works if he’s on the field. Frankly, that’s not something that we’ve been able to count on from #25 for quite some time. Good tackler that can lay the occasional hard hit. Decent underneath coverage guy. Mostly what Moore brings to the defense is attitude. Attitude can’t be coached, it can’t be taught, and it can’t be faked. It’s the same as being a leader (which Moore is also by the way), some guys naturally have it, all others do not. William Moore has it. I just wish he could have it on the field more. Over 30 years old, injury prone, big contract, not looking too good.

d7_ishmaelKemal Ishmael-signed through the 2016 season, $686,474 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$11,474 dead money, $675,000 cap savings

Cut post 6/1-same

Trade-same

For a former 7th round draft pick, Kemal has been nothing short of amazing. Each of the last 2 seasons, Ismael has had to fill in, A LOT, at both safety positions, but mostly strong safety. He’s not the biggest of strong safeties, which kinda plays against him, especially in Quinn’s defense. But Ishmael likes to hit, to jump up in the fray when bodies start flying around the field, which works against him as a free safety. I almost got the feeling Quinn and his staff were reluctant to put Ismael in, even when they really had no other choice. I like Kemal, but coaching staffs have what they look for at certain positions, and I just don’t know if Kemal fits the bill.

Akeem King-signed through the 2016 season, $525,000 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$0 dead money, $525,000 cap savings

Cut post 6/1-same

Trade-same

Oh, forgive me, I screwed up. Akeem was a strong safety in college but coach Quinn is attempting to make him a cornerback. I meant to list him with the cornerbacks and forgot. Sorry, I just don’t feel like going back and editing, so here goes nothing. Akeem was a 7th round draft pick with good size (6’3”, 212lbs). Instead of a strong safety, Quinn saw a cornerback. So Akeem spent the first part of the season on the practice squad trying to learn his new trade. Through a series of injuries, Akeem was finally promoted to the full squad and was immediately thrust into the fire on special teams and even some dime defense situations. In all honesty, Akeem’s play at CB was a mixed bag at best. You saw him do some good things, but also saw him get targeted in some one on one situations where he was grossly outmatched. He even came in and lined up at linebacker for 1 very important play against the Saints in the last game of the year and helped contribute a stop, covering our 2015 nemesis Ben Watson, which forced a punt and got us the ball back with a chance to win. We all remember how that turned out. I’ll actually be curious as to where Akeem lines up this season. I think he would have a better shot as a SS than a CB. We’ll see.

Free Safeties

-Ricardo Allen, Robenson Therezie, Charles Godfrey

d7_allenRicardo Allen-contract expired, unrestricted free agent

A strange odyssey brought Ricardo Allen to the starting FS spot in 2015. A fifth round pick in 2014 as a cornerback, Ricardo was placed on the practice squad at the beginning of the season, then promoted late in the season when injuries dictated so. Even then, he wasn’t given that many chances on the field under the old regime. 2015 arrived with a new coach, new system, and a new lease on life for Ricardo. Quinn immediately saw something in Allen that said he would be better off at FS. And Allen took his new opportunity and ran with it. Though not quite the size Quinn likes in his FS’s(5’9”, 185lbs), Allen brings every bit of his body when making tackles, and in the 2nd half of the season, he was reading opponents pass patterns better and better. In 2014, we saw a lot of miscommunication on the back side of the Falcons defense. You didn’t see that in 2015 and Ricardo was a main reason why. If he comes back, Allen is another that I would be very curious to see the strides made in the 2nd year of a new defense.

d7_therezieRobenson Therezie-under contract through the 2017 season, $525,000 cap charge

Cut pre 6/1-$0 dead money. $525,000 cap savings

Cut post 6/1-same

Trade-same

Robenson made the club as an UDFA out of Auburn. He has a real nose for the game and became an important part of the Falcons secondary in 2015. Therezie makes good breaks on the football and isn’t afraid to throw his entire body at opposing ball carriers. Pretty much a cookie cutter of Allen as far as size (5’9”, 213lbs), Robenson makes well do with what he has. Like Allen, I expect Therezie to come back in year 2 with a much better understanding, and thus much better play, though what he showed in year 1 was pretty good.

Charles Godfrey-contract expired, unrestricted free agent

Sometimes the economics and restraints of roster size makes for some comical roster management during the season. Godfrey was released by the Falcons on 9/15, then re-signed on 10/6 only to be released again on 10/20 and finally re-signed on 10/27. I had honestly thought it happened more than that. Godfrey is a veteran and a very useful player to have on a team. He can play either safety spot equally well, which is to say you don’t worry about him messing up his assignments no matter where he lines up. A career backup, Godfrey knows his station and excels at what he’s asked to do, and the Falcons counted on him a lot toward the back half of the season. His versatility should serve him well, but with 4 safeties under contract already and the probable re-signing of Ricardo Allen, Godfrey’s future is probably with another team.

Analysis: As solid as we are at CB, that’s how up in the air things are at both safety positions. William Moore can’t stay healthy, Ismael seems to be a really good back up, but not a starter and Akeem King is a SS trying to transition to CB. At FS, our starter is a free agent, the backup, though solid, was an UDFA and the swiss army knife Godfrey is a free agent. Some moves need to be made here, but which ones?

My Conclusion: I bring Allen back, he shouldn’t cost too much as he’s just had 1 year as a starter. Therezie is my backup. Sorry Charles, I like you but you got to go. William Moore? What to do? When he’s on the field he’s the heart and soul, but too often he’s just another pulse on the sideline. I cut him. And that’s a painful cut. But it’s time to move on. You can’t continually count on someone just to have them let you down (through no fault of his own). I draft someone here if someone I like is available at the right spot. This is an important position for Quinn’s defense to work. All the adulation thrown Richard Sherman’s way in Seattle, that defense didn’t really start to hum until Cam Chancellor took over at SS. It needs to be a LB-type that can cover WR’s and TE’s. Sua Cravens may be one in the upcoming draft, would probably have to take him in the 2nd round. Miles Killebrew is another that you could probably get in 3rd/4th round. An outside the box idea might be Deion Jones, OLB LSU. A bit on the small size for an OLB (6’1”, 220lbs) Deion can cover, can really run and is a sure tackler as well as a big hitter. I move Akeem back to his natural position of SS and he and Kemal can keep the spot warm until the rookie is ready. If we can somehow find a few extra picks, I’d like Jalen Miles from LSU at FS. I got to see him in a couple of games this year, and I really like what I see from him. Can cover, tackle and can get sideline to sideline in the blink of an eye. At 6’, 215lbs, Miles would offer that size advantage that neither Allen nor Therezie can. But like I said, that would be a luxury if we had the picks.

Prediction: I hope the Falcons have learned their lesson relying on the oft-injured year after year (2013, 2014 offensive line) and cut ties with William Moore. I don’t know if they draft anyone here because with just 5 picks, Quinn has stated that the trenches are where the concentration would be. Allen is brought back for the right price. There will be some UDFA’s and maybe a mid-level UFA at strong safety.

d7_close

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149 thoughts on “Roster Analysis: Part VII

  1. Arno

    Outstanding.

    The latest roster evaluation installment by Dewey makes a total of 17,266 words contributed to Cage readership by him over the last three and a half weeks. On behalf of the whole Cage, I can only begin to show due appreciation for your dedication and insights. You’ve launched the 2016 Falcons campaign with laser clarity for fans.

    Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      Arno – I counted 17,268 words but not asking for a recount. I to would like to add my appreciation for the time and ideas Dewey has contributed. Is there going to be a Part VIII: Special Teams?

      Reply
        1. Dewey

          It’s coming Arno. Our work here is not complete. It is a roster evaluation afterall, which includes lowly kickers. Just need to clean it up a bit, should be in your inbox sometime this evening.

          Reply
  2. Arno

    Alford robs Cousins.
    Ishmael snookers Bortles.
    Allen dismays Bradford.

    Love how these possibly considered ‘second tier’ d-backs made some inspired plays for the team. I feel the start of a great vibe for this unit.

    Reply
  3. Paddy O

    I rate Alford as a very good CB – his biggest problems since being drafted, is his penchant for penalties – holds mostly. Collins, when I watched him – seriously worried me – he is slow, and does not change direction very well. He should have NEVER been drafted, even in the 5th round. Makes me seriously question Quinn’s ability to gauge talent. That might have been entirely Carroll.

    Reply
  4. JB Falcon

    Thanks for keeping the cage rolling Dewey. Excellent post. I agree on Willie Mo but he’ll be hard to replace. No play, No pay?

    Reply
    1. Dewey

      Thanks JB. Willy Mo will be a tough call. But eventually they all move on. Deion, Dale Murphy, ‘Nique. Should get easier to say good-bye, but it never is (sniff).

      Reply
  5. Grits Blitz

    Dewey – Could not find one misrepresentation in Part 7. Thank you for continuing to use truthful glasses! While on the field, thank you Willy Mo, but
    agree it seems his time to seek other horizons has come. Also, would love to find a sucker we could trade Collins to and get
    something/anything in return. (Since coaches can go from d to o, perhaps the new fad will be to give him a shot at WR.)

    Also, agree with Paddy O. Because of Collins’ #2 pick alone and the delusional oversight of the O-line, D.Q.’s judgment has now
    earned full scrutiny with no more “being new” HC excuses nor can T.D. be blamed in the future for doing whatever it is he’s now doing.
    100% accountability for D.Q. and Arthur. EOS.

    Reply
    1. Dewey

      Thanks Grits. I agree. I’m seriously starting to worry about Quinn’s evaluation process. He loves to teach. Is that what he’s focused on? You can’t go through a draft thinking about how much you can teach someone and “if” they get it, how good they “could” be.

      Reply
  6. Grits Blitz

    With all due respect to Paddy O, I do disagree on one point.
    Believe if we really want a big upgrade at CB, to go “big time”, Alford would move to nickel and we get another Grimes or Trufant. (I’ve believed
    that for well over a year, now.)

    Reply
      1. Grits Blitz

        Paddy O – Very true…good point! He totally owns it. (Guess he’ll now be forced to keep him to avoid admitting his mistake.)

        Reply
  7. John Waynesworld

    You are making my head spin with your evals, Dewey. Great stuff, again!

    Although I have no idea of how to balance these contracts with the talent, I believe our Secondary is actually a strength if we can just figure out what to do when both Trufant and Alford come up for new contracts at the same time. The Collins pick is not helping that potential cap problem at this point. Drafting Lesson: Height-Weight-Speed vs game experience… Maybe a college DB needs those years of college experience on the field in order to succeed quickly in the modern NFL. Collins may turn out to be a good NFL player in a few years, but what good does that do us now? As far as Moore, I am confident we will find someone to play our future SS Sheriff, either in the Draft or Free Agency. Like Worrilow, if Kemal was a little faster he would be the man. As it is, Ishmael is a great depth player and Special Teamer.

    Quinn Speak!

    Reporter: “Coach, what do you think of (insert player’s name here)?”
    Quinn: “I think it’s the (insert action adverb here) that separates him.”

    Reply
    1. Dewey

      Thanks JWW. It will be tricky getting truant and Alford re-signed together. There should be plenty in the tank with cuts made this year and next of some big contracts. Hopefully, we can start building soon rather than constantly patching holes.

      Reply
  8. Flo-Ri-Duh

    Bringing this over from the other side…. this morning.

    Article by Leadbelly: Dan Quinn scouts Reggie Ragland (ILB) at the Sr. Bowl practice and was impressed by him. Says Ragland is bigger than expected and Quinn “felt” Ragland’s speed when covering the TE’s successfully. Ragland is expected to go mid-1st Rd from 15th to 20th slot.

    According to scout,Daniel Jeremiah, the biggest buzz and surrise at the Sr. Bowl practice has been Carson Wentz (QB), North Dakota State, 6’5″ 230 lb. Jeremiah says Wentz has shown a srong, NFL arm and can make all the throws accurately. Sounds like a future Dallas Cowboy to m!

    Reply
      1. Dewey

        Jalen Mills played the last 2 years as FS for LSU. I got to see him in 2 games this season and he was nothing short of amazing. He started at CB the 2 years prior to that (one reason our Jalen couldn’t crack their starting lineup). I don’t know why they are practicing him at CB. Maybe they just want to see if he can still do it. I’d love to have him patrolling centerfield for the Falcons. A big FS that can hit like a LB and cover like a CB.

        Reply
  9. SG

    Do you have a research staff Dewey?

    When do you sleep?

    Thanks for presenting an inspired and entertaining understanding of the state of the Falcons.

    Reply
    1. Dewey

      Thanks SG.

      I am my own research staff. But we’re always looking for able bodies. There’s no pay and the hours are long, but at least the benefits suck.

      I don’t get as much sleep as I’d like, that’s for sure.

      This is honestly my favorite part of the season. I love analyzing and re-building. I would be doing this anyway, it would just all be in my head instead typed up for all the world to see.

      Reply
  10. Flo-Ri-Duh

    DEWEY – T.D. now stands for Too Dumb. A new height in ineptness. Obviously T.D. never took “Common Sense in Negotiating 101”. Trufant & Alford both enter their final contract year as UFA’s (not RFA’s) at the end of the season. Their agents should ask for the MOON if Falcons want to extend their contracts before they expire because these guys will be in much demand. The Falcons have ZERO leverage in negotiating. At the end of ’16 BOTH Falcons starting CB’s could be gone to the highest bidder and there’s not a d-am thing T.D. can do about it. A strength in ’16 could dissapear just like that – a 1st & 2nd Rd pick gone. Perhaps that is why they drafted Jalen Collins in ’15 – panic mode.

    Ricardo Allen (FS) is a ERFA in ’16 meaning Falcons only have to put in the minimum NFL bid if they want to keep him and he can’t go anywhere else.

    William Moore (SS) – Oft injured and it’s a shame. He’s a TD/AB favorite but if DQ truly has the final say he could be gone.

    Kemal Ishmael (SS) – a decent backup wil be a UFA in ’17 but no need to rush to re-sign a backup this soon. If Moore is released / traded / gets injury settlement – then Falcons should draft a starting SS in this draft class – 2nd/3rd Rd.

    The rest of these guys are replaceable so not getting in to that here.

    Dewey – no major disagreements with you this time… but must admit I skipped the rant. A BIG question is where will Trufant & Alford be in ’17?
    A strength will turn bad if these guys aren’t signed BEFORE their contracts run out. T.D. = Too Dumb.

    Reply
  11. Dewey

    Hope some of you got to hear the Quinn/Dimwitt press conference going on 92.9. Tried to take notes but my short hand sux. If you can find it somewhere, the first 5-7 minutes were very interesting.

    From Quinn: Thomas and I have a clear vision where we want to go building this team

    From Dimwitt: The acquisition process is my decision

    When asked point blank about the “collaborative” decision making process…
    From Dimwitt: I have final say

    At one point, Dimwitt was explaining the chain of command with regards to personnel in the scouting department and he said, “it starts with me, then Scott and our college scouting……” he broke it all the way down, but I’m not going to type all that up.

    They went on and on, actually got a bit nauseating listening to Quinn and Dimwitt fawning all over one another, but if you can find the transcript or a recording, like I said, those first few minutes were quite telling.

    It didn’t sound at all like Dimwitt isn’t still neck deep in player evaluations, scouting, etc.

    Reply
    1. SG

      I agree it was often too nauseating – especially while driving. TD did say words to the effect that ultimately the coach, (now often referred to as “Q”), has to be happy because he knows best who’ll fit the schemes. He also apologized for the disaster of the 2012 draft.

      Reply
    2. Wings

      Dewey I heard some of it and the entire process they described sucks. The part I “liked” was if TD and DQ don’t agree on a potential draft pick, they let him pass. So no one has the authority to make the final decision. What a big JOKE!

      I urge the Cagers who have not heard the press conference to find it and listen. As you said, it is impossible to make notes and report what was said. It could pass as comedy routine.

      I think we have a head coach in on the job training. I recall what Ron Reverra said in an interview before last weeks playoff game, “I wish I had had a previous head coach on my staff during the initial years”. Maybe that is why R Morris is on the staff.

      The staff at 680 also have compiled a good group of the cliches that DQ uses – some funny stuff from them. It’s the only way to survive this Falcons’ big pile of sh!t.

      Reply
      1. Grits Blitz

        Wings – Indeed it does sound like OJT.
        As for the “corporate” way to make final decisions, D.Q. and T.D. have only followed A.B.’s preference so they now both know he’ll be … good with it.

        Reply
      2. Dewey

        Already getting tired of some of Quinn’s clichés. “Fast and physical” and “all about the ball” have already worn thin with me, so imagine how the players feel.

        Reply
    3. Paddy O

      I’m afraid DQ is a good DC, but does not have the back bone to be a HC. If TD is still honestly involved, we will continue to languish in the cellar.

      Reply
    1. John Waynesworld

      That would include placing the black dots on the Player Board and having the final say in Free Agency and in the Draft OVER the Head Coach.

      Dan Quinn is in charge of the 53-man roster, which in corporate-speak means the Head Coach will decide who is on the 53-man roster and who is on the Practice Squad. I knew when Blank was repeating that answer in the interview last year, he was being careful to repeat it exactly.

      We really should have known. How many other teams would have let this happen?

      Reply
    2. Grits Blitz

      JWW – In a nutshell, perfect in every way! You are the man. Picture and message crystal clear. Thank you for conveying the truth!

      Reply
  12. Hamad Meander

    I think I solved the mystery of the Jalen Collins pick. Dimitroff, in his infinite wisdom, though he was drafting Landon Collins (SS) from Alabama, but got the dudes mixed up. What I really don’t understand is why they didn’t move Jalen to safety. Listening to the Dimitroff presser, I was most disappointed to hear that if GM and Coach are at ‘loggerheads’ over a player, they just pass on the guy and move on. Let me get this straight, if they can’t agree, then they move on to the next best? How is that a Quinning strategy?

    Still petitioning for a Cage member to be in the Flowery Branch draft room…….

    Reply
  13. medallion

    Two cents from the random rambling guy:
    Trufant – he is only a UFA at the end of the 2016 league year if the Falcons don’t exercise the 5th year option that automatically goes with a 1st round pick.
    Alford – His contract is a 4 year contract and the Falcons can negotiate a contract extension this year just as it could have last year. I hope one gets worked out this year because, IMO, his play improved a lot in his 3rd year. Working out some contract extension at a reasonable cost might not be difficult because … [fill in reasons Cagers have noted before].
    Jalen Collins – nice rant Dewey – did you file for a copyright yet? Collins was a stunner to me also when it happened in 2nd round last year. The Freud in me wanted to type “was a stoner to me” for that sentence, but I waited a sentence out of deference to many potheads that turned out more than O.K. With Alford’s capabilities uncertain entering last year’s draft and Alford probably better suited for a nickel CB, I finally resigned myself to hoping that, at worst, Collins could take over as a starting CB in 2017 if Alford improved and the cost to resign Alford was too high.
    William Moore: I unfortunately agree it is time to move on.
    Akeem King: I wonder whether he might be a FS in training. Primarily a SS in college against lower level college teams. Seems to weigh too little for playing SS at the NFL level except maybe in big nickel packages where he would cover a TE.

    Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      med- Forgot about the 5th year option rule on UFA’s drafted in the 1st Rd. Looked it up and it’s part of the 2011 collective bargaining agreeent. If team exercises the 5th year option they must do it by May 3 of the players fourth season, with salary as follows [Desmond Trufant was drafted 22nd in the 1st round of the 2013 draft.] : For players picked 11-32, take the average salary of players picked 3rd-25th for that postion. That is what Trufant would be payed for his option year. (si.com) This option only applies to 1st Rd picks.

      I made a mistake and stand corrected.

      Reply
    2. Dewey

      med, thanks again for the kind words. Nice snag on the Trufant option year, I completely missed that. Must be getting dumber and/or lazier the deeper I get into this.

      Reply
      1. Flo-Ri-Duh

        I think they did the 5th year option on Julio Jones (WR). Just isn’t done that often because waiting that long is not advantageous for the Falcons in negotiating. While they can continue negotiating the shorter the time-span to free agency the more advantageous it is to the player’s agent if the player is in demand by othr teams. Falcons don’t want Trufant to reach the open market where there will be a bidding war.

        Reply
  14. Dewey

    So, from listening to Quinn/Dimwitt this afternoon, it sounds like the FO runs just like I suspected. Quinn signs off on all the players presented to him that he likes/wants/could use. Dimwitt makes it happen. So Jalen Collins could have been someone Quinn had interest in, but it was Dimwitt who decided to grab him in the 2nd round. Really curious who the next option was there……on second thought, I don’t want to know (go to your happy place Dewey, go to your happy place).

    Quinn + Dimwitt = Quinnwitt or Dimquinn, I can’t decide.

    Reply
  15. Wings

    Dewey

    RANT TIME!!!!!!!!! ANYONE WHO DOESN’T WANT TO READ ME GOING ON A TIRADE, SKIM DOWN TO THE NEXT PLAYER PLEASE!!!!!

    Loved that RANT!!!

    Reply
  16. waynesworldreview

    Quinn was effusive in his praise for Ala ILB Reggie Ragland at the Sr. Bowl, prompting several draft sites to make RR our 1st rounder, which could very well be the direction we go. The WR from Ohio st Braxton Miller is another name that popped up in association with ATL. He said he’d love to work opposite JJ. He’s likely a 3-4th rounder. Drafttek has us taking Ragland in rd 1 and the big OC from Ala Ryan Kelly in rd 2. I would not complain at all if we did just that…..

    Reply
  17. Grits Blitz

    Read in the paper Fri. a.m. about T.D.’s press conference with D.Q. at his side.
    “While Dimitroff stressed Thursday that HE RETAINS the final say on who the Falcons draft and sign, he did little to dispel the notion that Quinn was largely responsible for saving his job. Quinn has clear picture of where Falcons are headed.”

    Wonderful. Very encouraging. Full of hope or full of _____? Now willingly joined at the hip for the full ride, knowing poor results in doing one’s job don’t matter to Arthur, this triangular bromance will be inseparable.
    Oh, what could have been…

    Reply
    1. JB Falcon

      Miller seems to be very “iffy” according to that article. IF he masters his shortcomings at WR and IF his medical history doesn’t come back to haunt him he could be a prize pick and, if in an emergency, used as a back up QB. IF he should be there in the second round, do we use that pick on him or do we proceed with our goal of enhancing the trenches with a proven, hard core, player?

      Reply
      1. SG

        My hope JB, is that the FO realizes, that we as fans, don’t really give a carp about their self-ordained importance and their lengthy, useless pressers that don’t say anything other than how important they are, (without clarifying why they are important). Instead they should be focused on the long-ignored job of addressing the Oline – in FA, and target first the D-line, LBs in the draft . And then, if they don’t exhaust themselves by actually doing their job, look for adding potential gems, like a Miller, if he slips to a round after the primary needs are, by some miracle, addressed.

        Reply
    2. Flo-Ri-Duh

      SG – If I recall correctly Braxton Miller played only one year at WR after playing high school & college ball previously as a QB. He had around 25 receptions and 2 TD’s. Not saying he doesn’t have the talent. He can fly but his experience level isn’t where I would take him higher than 4th Rd considering the Falcons other needs. Practice is one thing but let’s see how he does in the actual game.

      Reply
      1. SG

        Yup Flo, he’s gotta grow some experience but as one reporter commented that regarding all WRs at he Senior Bowl, “There’s Braxton Miller, then everyone else…” he may be a gem that falls.

        Reply
        1. Flo-Ri-Duh

          SG- Falcons showed their willingness to draft talented “projects” that needed developing in 2015: Jalen Collins, Tevin Coleman and Justin Hardy all were in need of “developing” and should be much better in ’16. Braxton Miller would also come under the “needs developing” label – so why not take him if they think he’s worth it? They do have more pressing needs in the early rounds – all I’m saying.

          Reply
  18. Flo-Ri-Duh

    article in falcoholic.com mentions that Kyle Shanahan isn’t at the Senior bowl.

    Jake Long (OT) only played 11 snaps in 2015 season and he is not likely to return in 2016 (falcoholic.com)

    Falcons taking a more srious look at the backup QB position in 2016 and could draft one late. (falcoholic.com)

    Reply
  19. JB Falcon

    “They (the Panthers) have been very consistent with their approach,” Dimitroff said. “It’s something that we believe in here. We are going to continue to be consistent.”
    There ya’ go friends and neighbors. Consistent failure! Yea!

    Reply
    1. Chop Buster

      I’m getting to the point where I’m tiring of the Falcons front office and their B.S. For the first time since I’ve been a fan of this team, I have ZERO interest in following what they do in the off-season.

      I can’t even stand to see or hear the garbage spewed from Dumitroff–and Quinn as well. Just go get a room already. This instant love affair between these two is sickening.

      Reply
  20. SG

    Chuck Smith was on 92.9 w/ Hugh & John this AM. Sorry I missed as he apparently rolled off a list of D impact players that he really likes in Mobile, including Reggie Ragland, who he’s projecting to go in top 10.

    Reply
  21. Flo-Ri-Duh

    Could see the Bears, pick #11, taking Reggie Ragland. Next team needing an ILB would be Raiders at #14. Then the Falcons at #17 but not convinced the Falcons would take him over some other guys on the board. Still think they would prefer a base, 3 down, DE pass rusher if one they like is still there. Ragland wouldn’t be a bad pick for Falcons – surely an upgrade.

    Reply
  22. waynester

    Flo
    Drafting DEs–or rather TD drafting DEs–in rd 1 worries the heck out of me since the transition to the NFL is such a BIG leap for that position. I’d rather pursue a proven guy in FA ala John Abraham.
    Right now, the way the mocks are falling, it looks like LB. OL or WR may be where the value is for our need positions. There’ll be some change after the Sr Bowl and even more post-Combine but most of the round One “cream” has already risen to the top. The big moves up & down will mostly happen outside the top 20. Unless we trade back (which makes this whole discussion moot) we can most likely go ahead and set our draft board now. Any team with competent scouting and player evaluation should ALREADY know who they’re targeting long before the dog & pony shows begin. If you’ve waited until a few months before the draft to figure it out, you’re too late. Which, looking back, we may have been doing. I mean Peria Jerry? Peter Konz? Inexplicable…..

    Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      waynester – Just follow what Arthur Blank and Dan Quinn said early on that DL/OL is the top priority. Also said last year that pass-rush was the #1 priority.. They had the worst pass rush in the NFL in 2015. THE deepest quality position in this draft is DT/NT. Falcons should keep an eye on the future since they are in a rebuilding mode and take Andrew Billings (DT/NT), Baylor, 6’2″ 310 lb. He has elite power, and unusual closing speed for a big guy- a rare playmaking NT/DT at the point of attack. What’s the one thing QB’s hate the most when passing: interior pressure collapsing the pocket. This kid isn’t even 20 years old yet. He’s that good now and he’s 19! I think he has more upside than any other DL in this draft. He’s my pass disruptor from the interior. Eats double teams up and goes right through them.

      Reply
      1. waynesworldreview

        Hard to dispute that–especially teamed with Jarrett. The could absolutely destroy a pocket and make a QB’s nightmares come true. I fall in love with prospects sometimes and this year Jaylon Smith is my man-crush….

        Reply
        1. Flo-Ri-Duh

          waynesworldreview- Don’t get your hope up to much: #1 Don’t think he will still be there at 17th and #2 if he is Falcons need somebody YESTERDAY; not a year from now. With the past criticism of drafting damaged goods: Baker, Jarie, etc, etc, etc…. don’t see it.

          Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      waynester – I’m thinking Danny Trevathan (ILB), age 26, Broncos. He’s a UFA and he’s from Georgia and rumor is he’s interested in the Falcons. He’s better right now than anyone you can get in this draft.

      Reply
  23. waynester

    For now, I’m on the Jaylon Smith bandwagon, hoping by some miracle of the Lord’s grace that he falls to us in rd1. He’s the complete package at ANY LB position which would make him invaluable for us for years to come. For those worried about his knee…
    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000619404/article/report-no-nerve-damage-for-notre-dame-lb-jaylon-smith
    This good news could mean he goes before us to (as Flo noted above) #11 CHI or #14 OAK….

    Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      waynester – That is good news and I’m happy for the young man. Still a lot of pain and hard work ahead of him. He has the determination and will to get there – in time. Main thing is to be patient and not rush him back. Could take up to 1 1/2 years to fully recover.

      Reply
  24. waynesworldreview

    Heck, as long as I’m the only one on here, I might as well monopolize the board!!!!
    Center has been a problem since Mud Duck retired. Here’s the guy I’m hoping we can grab in round 2….
    http://www.nfl.com/draft/2016/profiles/ryan-kelly?id=2555191
    3 years starting for Nick Saban? You’ve got to be good–and he is. He’s not going to wow anybody at the combine but he’s a trench WARRIOR….

    Reply
    1. Wings

      As Buck Belue said yesterday on 680, we don’t care about all those numbers and statistics on a guy.
      The question is “Can he play football?”

      Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      Westerman would be a good fit in the zone-blocking scheme and a good 3rd round pick. Whitehair , Garnett, Westerman in that order – one should be on arod for Falcons.

      Reply
    1. waynesworldreview

      SG
      follow the link for Christian Westerman that I posted above. His NFL comparison is none other than Alex Mack. Can I pick ’em or what?

      Reply
  25. waynesworldreview

    Round 7 I’m looking for a backup QB, but BPA certainly applies here. Maybe Dak Prescott but he has a lot of improving to do. I’d also consider Jeff Coker from AL and Jake Driscoll, the former Gaytor. I’d give Aaron Murray a camp invite since he was showing great improvement as the #3 at KC before being cut….

    Reply
        1. Flo-Ri-Duh

          No thank you. I like Jacoby Brisett (QB). N.C.State, 6’3″ 235 lb.,as a developmental QB in the 4th Rd. Has ability to eventually be a starter NFL- say when MR’s contract runs out and Falcons DON’T re-sign him again – or maybe they TRADE him in a couple of years.

          Reply
  26. medallion

    What we can accomplish in the FA period before the draft with respect to the OL is, IMO, the biggest key to so much of how we draft this year and so much more.
    Every NFL team has at least one below average starter on the OL. In theory, every NFL team can compensate for one below average starter on the OL when it comes to pass blocking. With one weak OT, TE or RB help before TE or RB moves on in passing route and/or some rollouts/moving pockets away from the weak OT. With one weak OG, help from the OC and/or a good pass blocking FB/RB (and/or some type of TE maybe even named after Dan Henning which knick name I promised to never type again in the Cage about 2 years ago).
    A very athletic QB helps a lot with that type of problem (e.g., Brees, Wilson), but Ryan isn’t “very athletic”. He is, however, more athletic than many “pocket passers” which helps some.
    We also can’t expect much from Freeman or Coleman in pass blocking with problems up the middle in pass blocking no matter how much they might learn about technique (physics which I never studied involved, but I do know a taller light weight car doesn’t fare well against much bigger cars already moving at some decent speed). Side notes: I didn’t understand why DiMarco wasn’t used a lot last year on obvious passing downs to help in pass protection. Maybe he isn’t good at lateral movements to adjust to where pressure is coming from. I wonder whether Mooney might be since he was a RB in college and maybe DiMarco and Mooney make the team next year, with Mooney also being a short yardage back.
    Compensating for two below average OL players is really tough.
    Drafting 2 OL players to start in the NFL in their first year could be a recipe for a disaster for a year (or longer if Ryan gets injured), but we could end up with no reasonable alternative besides using our top 2 picks or 2 of our top 3 picks to do that.

    .

    Reply
      1. medallion

        I agree our young RBs can get better, but merely getting better doesn’t, IMO, promise much help when really big people are already moving quickly towards our QB up the middle.
        If there’s no “want to” in a player in any sport, that player isn’t likely to succeed long term. However, having all the “want to” in the world and having “technique” are frequently not enough to overcome physical limitations in comparison to others that also have “want to” and “technique”.
        Quizz was quite good at pass blocking, but we were PBS then with (mainly) stouter inside 3 on the OL and we had problems with OT protection then which meant he dealt more with a slowed down inside DT/NT or helped on the outside or helped with a LB blitz somewhere where the weight differential was offset to some extent by Quizz’s quick short distance speed, agility, and low body mass.

        Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      The best formula would be to draft one interior OL and draft one. The UFA pool is much deeper this year at guard than center. The pool in the draft is reasonably good at center. That in mind UFA a guard and draft a center. Re-sign Chester to a short-term deal for depth. Levitre?

      A big part of a RB’s pass-blocking is technique and want to. Quizz Rodgers was an excellent pass-blocker and he wasn’t a big guy. Our RB’s should get better.

      Reply
  27. John Waynesworld

    For the O Line, my preference would be to get 2 Guards in Free Agency and draft a Center. This Draft is loaded with Centers and there will be some very good ones in the 3rd & 4th rounds. I am not one who thinks breaking the bank on a Center is money well spent. Guards? Hell yea.

    If surrounded by veteran Guards, a solid rookie Center should have no problems acclimating. Of course we have to watch out that “Final Say” Dimitroff doesn’t prefer a Center who is better at public speaking and walking old ladies across streets than he is at being an anchor and snapping the freaking ball.

    After Thursday’s BS press conference I am in the same thinking as many here that there is no confidence in gathering personnel for this team moving forward. There will always be potentially great players that Dimitroff’s overriding black balls keep off our team.

    All we can do is hope that Dimitroff somehow ‘blind squirrels’ on his boy scout picks, and that sucks.

    (Insert pic of yes-man Dan Quinn nodding his head at everything Dim says)

    A quote from Senior Bowl practice…”Nothing drives a Head Coach more crazy that a failed QB-Center exchange. That is the basics of football.” And our HC let that problem continue from game to game to game while a perfectly good veteran Center was on our bench until the last game of the season, why? Pride, because Person was his guy? A fail on Quinn to file away.

    The only optimism I have is that anybody we pick in FA or the Draft will likely be better than who we presently have at those positions, which is almost all positions. Some optimism, huh, like mustard and biscuits is tasty food if you’re hungry, Mhm.

    Reply
    1. Flo-Ri-Duh

      TD is my BLACK DOT. Still don’t go along with the theory that TD is actually choosing who we draft. It’s DQ – and that’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

      Reply
    2. Paddy O

      our defensive problem is QB pressure. We appear to have gone backwards last year. How do we select a new defensive minded HC who does not like to blitz? Think we see major progress next year regarding QB pressure??

      Reply
    1. Hamad Meander

      Put me down as “JACKED” as well. Except I’m feeling more hijacked right now with Dimitroff still making picks. Maybe I should be more “WHACKED”. Matt Ryan feels “SACKED” about this upcoming season. I just hope we don’t get “SMACKED”.

      Reply
      1. Grits Blitz

        HM – QB, Ryan, probably has his own version of “sacktime” at night this offseason and is continually viewing “The Blind Side” while lobbying to D.Q. for some/any help! (Of course, DQ will have to ask for permission from TD first.)

        Reply
        1. Flo-Ri-Duh

          Grits – When MR complains about getting beat up with this crummy pass-blocking, TD just says that’s why you make the big bucks. If you care to contribute some of that cash to a fund for OL talent we’ll accept it gladly.

          Reply
          1. Grits Blitz

            Flo – Probably so. Alas, TD has probably taken a page from Mad Magazine with his “what, me worry?” approach…
            ( Just spotted: Ice seen visiting Lloyds of London for a new rider on his extensive policy!)

  28. John Waynesworld

    Watching the Senior Bowl (North) practice replay at OL. Although I believe the Falcons first 2 picks should be on the defensive side, using our #50 on Center Nick Martin would be okay with me. He is super strong, near-technically perfect, and has a nasty streak.

    In the 3rd if he’s still there, OC Jack Allen would be a great value. He seems to play smarter than the guy rushing, adjusting his stance before the defender even finishes his move. Not big, but strong with great technique. He is be a player I would trust starting as a rookie if he had two decent Guards book-ending him.

    G Joshua Garnett had some bad snaps but had more good snaps. He was good in the 11 on 11s. He’s not as big as I thought he would be so he may be good in space for the ZBS. G/C Austin Blythe is NOT a good Guard. He may be a good Center but he is light in the butt and was owned by just about everybody at practice. He also held twice in only a handful of snaps.

    OT’s: OT Joe Dahl, who’s really an OL, and Cole Toner looked great against big school stars. Willie Beavers needs some work and he may not be a quick enough for OT. Jason Spriggs should be a 1st rounder. He was treated differently by the coaches because he was almost always winning his contests. Kyle Murphy looked solid and was praised several times (at RT).

    The D Line looked excellent. DT Sheldon Day looked great as did DEs Jihad Ward and Carl Nassib. Nassib looked really good at times. He is tall and long, has good moves and is “slippery fast” as Bill Polian put it. OLB Kyler Fackrell had some quickness as a pass rusher. Very tall. I have heard talk he may get into the 1st round as well if not top of the 2nd. DE Jason Fanaika had some good plays. ILB Jared Norris is fast and very strong. He was impressive in one-on-ones.

    There is a Michigan State DE I had not heard of who was getting praise from D Line coach Rod Marinelli. His name is Lawrence Thomas and he is listed as a DT in most publications (#258 on Draft’s board, haha). Marinelli put him on the edge and he looked good with a few moves.

    http://www.nfl.com/draft/2016/profiles/lawrence-thomas?id=2555376

    I have only seen but one replay of the South side practice and they are even better on D Line. If the Falcons go defense with their 2nd pick there will be loads of D Line talent to choose from. It would be easier, in my mind, to pass on a DE at #17 and go LB (Ragland, Floyd, Fackrell, Wright, Lee), knowing you can get a talented D Line beast in the 2nd round. This may be the best D Line class (dare I say) ever.

    Reply
  29. Dewey

    From atlantafalcons.com. I’m sorry guys, but there is absolutely nothing here that inspires me……….except for the fact they’re paying attention to the trenches.

    When general manager Thomas Dimitroff evaluates players, his eye is instantly drawn to prospects that show athleticism, competitiveness, toughness and pure skill at their respective positions.

    The Senior Bowl has proved to be a valuable resource for Dimitroff and his staff when it comes to finding quality draft picks.

    “When we are at the Senior Bowl, we are looking for athleticism, how a player moves, explosiveness, grit and finish, and we are usually able to take that in quite quickly,” Dimitroff said.

    There is a big difference between seeing a player on film and watching them live. Knowing this, Dimitroff puts a lot of emphasis on evaluation at the Senior Bowl, insisting that he and his staff leave Mobile, Ala. with a good read on all of the top players in the draft.

    You can’t walk away from the Senior Bowl and have a final grade on someone, but you get an idea on how they move and what their true abilities are, juxtaposing to other top-notch talent in the country is beneficial for us as well,” said Dimitroff.

    Atlanta’s current roster features nine players who attended the Senior Bowl. Justin Hardy, Grady Jarrett, Joey Mbu, Ra’Shede Hageman, Desmond Trufant, Malliciah Goodman, Robert Alford, William Moore and Matt Ryan all made a case for themselves while competing in the all-star game.

    This year’s Senior Bowl game features an especially talented group of offensive and defensive linemen.

    “It is a very interesting draft for both fronts, defensive line and offensive guard/tackle position,” Dimitroff said of position groups that stood out. “It’s encouraging to see a position in this league that is so important continue to produce viable candidates to come into the NFL.”

    Dimitroff and head coach Dan Quinn recently expressed they have a very clear vision for the Falcons moving forward, and the Senior Bowl gave them a chance to evaluate players who can contribute to their future plans.

    “To be able to discuss position drills while we were watching live was invaluable,” Dimitroff said of being at the Senior Bowl with Quinn. “We were able to share our opinions; it’s just a really good session for us.”

    Reply
    1. JB Falcon

      I didn’t get to watch the whole game but #55 stood out on the line, his name was Reed on the North team. I seen a couple of guys that costed themselves millions over a couple of dropped passes. That WR, #1 I think, MIller, who is projected to to compliment JJ has a long way to go.

      Reply
      1. John Waynesworld

        JB, I can’t find a #55 on the North team, but #55 on the South team was OG Cody Whitehair. There is one Reed, Jarran #90 and another D Lineman named D.J. Reader. Maybe he was a late add.

        Reply
        1. JB Falcon

          I guess I should have paid more attention. I had to leave at 10-0 and got back at 27-10. Good thing I ain’t gettin’ paid as a scout.

          Reply
      1. Dewey

        The entire presser is quite lengthy. You really only need to listen to the first 12 minutes or so. After that it just becomes a contest of who could compliment who more.

        Reply
    1. gman

      I may be chastised for this but I felt like these guys were very sincere and I didn’t take it as being bulls!!ted. Maybe I’m gullible but I liked what I heard.

      Reply
      1. Dewey

        gman, I don’t believe there was any BS in what they were saying either. The BS was last year when King Arthur led us to believe the front office was being run differently from what Quinnwitt explained.

        Reply
        1. gman

          I still think Q has the upper hand on who he wants for “his” scheme and TD will do his best to make it happen. I kind of felt that TD wasn’t necessarily saying that he decision was most important as much as he was saying the buck stops here. I have to appreciate that.

          Reply
  30. John Waynesworld

    ‘The BS was last year when King Arthur led us to believe the front office was being run differently…’ – Dewey

    This is where I got off the imaginary bus. After the quotes from Dim’s mouth this past week, ALL the temporary forgiveness I gave to the Falcons’ owner Arthur Blank last year… when he put Dim in a so-called ‘diminished position’ ….has gone away.

    Side note on the presser…Did you all hear Dim say that he regretted the Konz pick but “not as a person but as a disappointing draft pick”? So he’s claiming a modicum of success because he drafted “a good person”? I was floored.

    A blast from the past….”Dewey – I heard Arthur Blank say out of his own mouth that Dan Quinn would be in charge of the 53 man roster. Does that mean he is in charge of who’s on the roster or in charge of the roster after Dimwitroff screws it up?” Flo (Feb 3, 2015).

    And we have the same question exactly a year later?

    Here’s an example off the top… Quinn has 3 names of DE’s whom he tells Dim that he wants at #17. The better 2 of the 3 have college suspensions due to mary jane (gasp). The 3rd has an injury history but graduated Summa Cum Loudli and was a team captain his entire college career. When Quinn walks into the Falcons draft room that Thursday night, does he even see those other 2 players’ names on the Falcons’ board?

    What I want to know – Does Quinn have control over whose names are on the Falcons’ draft board before the Draft begins, and does he select the players himself off that board in front of him based on availability only on Thursday night? Sure, Dim picks up the phone and calls it in, but who actually picks? That board should be clear of disagreement well before Draft Day.

    This is where splitting lying hairs is the sometimes an outsider’s job, because nobody in the clicky Falcons’ circle, including everyone who sets foot on Flowery Branch soil, wants to over-rock the fun boat.

    Reply
    1. Dewey

      JWW,

      Excellent questions and ones that I fear we will never truly know the answers to. Here’s my take, and this is just how I think it happens based on what I’ve heard/read as it pertains to the draft.
      -Quinn sets parameters for what he’s looking for in a player at each position (height, weight, arm length, personal background, etc.)
      -the scouts find players that they feel fit these parameters (Quinn said there could be players considered outside these parameters).
      -Pioli brings the final findings to Quinn, and they talk about each player
      -Quinn then meets with Dimwitt, and they go over the list (Quinn said here if there are disagreements on a player/players they go back to the tape, if they can’t agree, they go back to the tape, they keep going back to the tape, if it becomes apparent that one cannot convince the other, the players name gets thrown out).
      -with the final list made, they rank their hopeful draftees, all of whom have Quinn’s seal of approval
      -at draft time, Dimwitt calls the shots, he’s in charge of picking the players. I’m sure there’s some discussion, but if Dimwitt thinks we need to chose a player in a certain round, that’s what happens.
      -once camp starts and they have their 90 players, that’s where Quinn says who stays and who goes. Though I’m sure there is some discussion how it pertains to the salary cap.

      This is just how I think it happens, however 1 thing is crystal clear, Dimwitt still has influence over players in the draft, how big or small of an influence, we may never really know.

      Reply

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